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Congreve Rolling Ball Clock Circa 1973

¥390,000.00

A very rare Congreve Rolling Ball clock made by Thwaites and Reed, the oldest clock manufacturing company in the world. The clock comes from a limited edition of 100. The stand is made of lacquered brass with “Zig-Zag” table. Four Corinthian columns support the pediments. Three separate dials are silvered and show hours, minutes and seconds. Mahogany based with adjustable feet is decorated with silvered plaque – “This clock is No.49 of a limited edition of 100, made in 1973 by Thwaites and Reed Ltd”. The clock comes with an original key marked with number 49.

SKU: 1357 Categories: , ,

A very rare Congreve Rolling Ball clock made by Thwaites and Reed, the oldest clock manufacturing company in the world. The clock comes from a limited edition of 100. The stand is made of lacquered brass with “Zig-Zag” table. Four Corinthian columns support the pediments. Three separate dials are silvered and show hours, minutes and seconds. Mahogany based with adjustable feet is decorated with silvered plaque - “This clock is No.49 of a limited edition of 100, made in 1973 by Thwaites and Reed Ltd”. The clock comes with an original key marked with number 49.

The inventor of rolling ball clock, Sir William Congreve was a Member of Parliament and an English inventor specializing in rocket science. His work greatly contributed to rocket research and development program of Royal Arsenal. The rockets, called Congreve rockets, were inspired by Indian weapon used against British army during Anglo-Mysore Wars. Congreve’s invention was scientifically advanced and British army employed it at battlefields from 1806 until 1850s.
Sir William Congreve led an interesting and full life. For many years, he was involved in politics, publishing and business enterprises. For his military service in the Hanoverian army, he was decorated with Order of St. George and Order of the Sword. Sir William was also a close friend of a Prince Regent and organized impressive firework spectacle for his coronation as King George IV. In 1826 after his involvement in a major fraud case was discovered, Sir William fled to France, where he died two years later.